Effects of Physical Activity and Psychological Distress between Medical Comorbidity and HRQOL among People with Mental Illness: A Moderated Mediation Analysis

Files

final_submission_moon1.pdf

Citation

Moon, Ingyu, “Effects of Physical Activity and Psychological Distress between Medical Comorbidity and HRQOL among People with Mental Illness: A Moderated Mediation Analysis,” Scholar@Simmons, accessed December 4, 2020, https://beatleyweb.simmons.edu/scholar/items/show/120.

Title

Effects of Physical Activity and Psychological Distress between Medical Comorbidity and HRQOL among People with Mental Illness: A Moderated Mediation Analysis

Creator

Moon, Ingyu

Date

2018

Description

More than 68% of adults with people with mental illness reported at least one medical disorder (Druss & Walker, 2011). Due to the combination of medical conditions and
symptoms of mental illness, poor health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is common for people with mental illness (Barnes et al., 2012; Folsom et al., 2009). Lower levels of physical activity and severe psychological distress among people with mental illness are also the important contributing factors to decreased HRQOL. The purposes of this study were: 1) exploring differences in the co-occurrence of health-related factors such as presence of
comorbidity, severity of psychological distress, and levels of physical activity between people with mental illness and the general population; 2) delineating the roles of physical activity and psychological distress when medical comorbidity affects HRQOL of people with mental illness.
A total of 3,797 individuals with mental illness and 32,621 individuals without mental illness were selected from the 2013 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (CDC,
2017). The criteria of mental illness in this study was having a depressive disrder, and taking medicine or receiving treatment for mental health problmes at the time of contact. For the first research purpose, bivariate analyses were conducted to compare the key factors of
interest between people with mental illness and without mental illness. Next, hierarchical regressions and structural equation modeling were conducted to examine mediation, moderation, and moderated mediation effects of physical activity and psychological distress using 3,797 individuals with mental illness. iv People with mental illness have higher rates of comorbidity and psychological
distress than people without mental illness, whereas general health, levels of physical activity and HRQOL of people with mental illness were lower than those without mental illness. Another key finding is a moderated mediation effect that levels of physical activity diminished the impact of comorbidity on psychological distress, which in turn makes the negative impact of comorbidity less likely to affect HRQOL among people with mental
illness. The results indicate that increased physical activity might be linked with decreasing psychological distress and increasing HRQOL of people with mental illness when they have comorbid medical health problems.

Publisher

Simmons College (Boston, Mass.)

Format

1 PDF (149 Pages)

Language

English

Type

Doctoral Dissertations

Collection