Examining the Behavior of Remembering Utilizing Eye Movements in a Delayed Match to Sample Task

Files

Citation

Hegg, Elisa, “Examining the Behavior of Remembering Utilizing Eye Movements in a Delayed Match to Sample Task,” Scholar@Simmons, accessed January 16, 2021, http://beatleyweb.simmons.edu/scholar/items/show/169.

Title

Examining the Behavior of Remembering Utilizing Eye Movements in a Delayed Match to Sample Task

Creator

Hegg, Elisa

Date

2017

Description

Measures of eye gaze fixations, including the number and duration, were examined during the delay and comparison in a delayed match-to-sample task. In Experiment 1 participants responded yes or no using a key press to indicate whether the comparison matched any of the one, two, or four stimuli from the initial sample. Experiment 2 was developed as pilot study. Participants responded using a key press to indicate which quadrant of the screen the comparison had been presented in, moving from two- to four-stimulus initial samples. Across both Experiment 1 and Experiment 2 the increase in number of stimuli resulted in an increase in complexity, indicated by a decrease in accuracy across all participants. The average frequency, and total average duration, of eye movements during the delay increased as the number of stimuli increased. Data on observing responses from the time that the comparison was presented up to the participant’s response were more variable. Together, these results extend the research on complex human behavior by utilizing an objective measure to examine an otherwise largely covert behavior.

Publisher

Simmons College (Boston, Mass.)

Format

1 PDF (99 Pages)

Language

English

Type

Doctoral Dissertations