An Investigation of Interactive Voice Response and a Care Management Program on Medication Adherence and Health Utilization in a Senior Population

Files

05042015_cempellin_manuscript (2).pdf

Citation

Cempellin, Diane, “An Investigation of Interactive Voice Response and a Care Management Program on Medication Adherence and Health Utilization in a Senior Population,” Scholar@Simmons, accessed January 16, 2021, http://beatleyweb.simmons.edu/scholar/items/show/185.

Title

An Investigation of Interactive Voice Response and a Care Management Program on Medication Adherence and Health Utilization in a Senior Population

Creator

Cempellin, Diane

Date

2015

Description

Poor adherence with prescribed medications can lead to poor clinical outcomes, worsening of disease, increased healthcare costs, deteriorated quality of life, and even death. Seniors including those on Medicare, are more likely to have chronic conditions and to be prescribed multiple medications that need to be taken at certain times and/or under certain conditions (for example, before or after a meal). The purpose of this project was to investigate the effectiveness of an Automated Interactive Voice Response System (IVR) outreach intervention on medication adherence rates for older adults with chronic disease using a reminder call to identify members who were non-adherent to their medication regime.

Additionally, this intervention investigated the impact of a nurse case management program (MyCarePath), among a high risk group of comorbid older adults on improving medication adherence, as measured by Proportion of Days Covered (PDC) in comparison to providing usual care. The theoretical perspective for this study was based on the basic principles of The Medication Adherence Model. A quantitative quasi- experimental design study using an Interactive Voice Response (IVR) reminder call system (a technology that automates interactions with telephone callers) was used to identify all Medicare Supplement Health Insurance Plan (SHIP) members living in the pilot markets that had pharmacy coverage through UnitedHealthcare (Medicare Part D or other pharmacy coverage) and were non-adherent to a prescribed medication regimen. For both studies the main outcome measures were improved PDC, decrease in utilization, and reduction in prescription costs and total costs with maintenance medications. Analysis was completed through a retrospective review of claims indicating refills of medication and health care utilization. Both studies did not improve PDC nor was a statistically significant difference found in any medication group. The IVR study found there was a decrease in emergency room visits, inpatient visits and nursing home admissions although most results were non-significant. There was no associated decrease in emergency room visits, inpatient visits and nursing home admissions for with the MCP program participants. Finally, there was no associated increase in savings in either prescription drug or total costs for either study.

Publisher

Simmons College (Boston, Mass.)

Format

1 PDF (140 Pages)

Language

English

Type

Doctoral Dissertations