Pain Assessment Education for Intermediate Care Orthopedic Nurses to Improve Pain Score Documentation

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Citation

Murphy Kenyon, Mary Anne, “Pain Assessment Education for Intermediate Care Orthopedic Nurses to Improve Pain Score Documentation,” Scholar@Simmons, accessed December 4, 2020, https://beatleyweb.simmons.edu/scholar/items/show/189.

Title

Pain Assessment Education for Intermediate Care Orthopedic Nurses to Improve Pain Score Documentation

Creator

Murphy Kenyon, Mary Anne

Date

2018

Description

The results of the January 2016 Joint Commission Accreditation Review shed light on the need for a quality improvement strategy to improve compliance with pain score reassessment documentation for nurses working in the orthopedic unit of a large teaching hospital in Boston. Following Lewin’s Theory of Change (Shirey, 2013), fifty-five nurses participated in a pretest completing the City of Hope Knowledge and Attitude Survey Regarding Pain (KASRP) and fishbone diagram exercise to unfreeze their current practice and explore barriers to documentation compliance. After participating in a one hour, evidence-based educational program guided by the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) Curriculum on Pain for Nursing, the nurses completed the KASRP as a posttest. The aim of this quality improvement project was to improve the pain assessment and reassessment practice, as evidenced by improved and sustained pain scale score documentation that meets the Joint Commission compliance expectation of ninety percent. Pretest and posttest scores reflect the percentage of questions answered correctly. Results include an aggregated mean pretest score of 72.1042 and mean posttest score of 76.0209, t (54) = -3.722, p = .000. Quantitative statistical analysis identified a positive correlation between the KASRP pretest-score and posttest-score (r = -.362, n = 55, p = .01). The statistically significant improvement demonstrated that the nurses were able to move and improve their knowledge about pain management following the educational intervention. Weekly chart audits determined that staff were able to refreeze practice and improve the pain score documentation compliance. Six months after completing this quality improvement (QI) project, the pain score reassessment documentation compliance improved from 65.75% to 83%. Further staff education is needed to sustain this improvement and future work will include identifying solutions to overcome barriers to documentation.

Keywords: quality improvement, orthopedic, nursing, pain assessment, pain scale

Publisher

Simmons College (Boston, Mass.)

Format

1 PDF (112 Pages)

Language

English

Type

Doctoral Dissertations