Racial/Ethnic Identity as a Factor of Academic Resilience in Female Black and Hispanic Undergraduate College Students Attending a PWI

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Citation

Miremadi-Baldino, Delvina, “Racial/Ethnic Identity as a Factor of Academic Resilience in Female Black and Hispanic Undergraduate College Students Attending a PWI,” Scholar@Simmons, accessed January 16, 2021, http://beatleyweb.simmons.edu/scholar/items/show/196.

Title

Racial/Ethnic Identity as a Factor of Academic Resilience in Female Black and Hispanic Undergraduate College Students Attending a PWI

Creator

Miremadi-Baldino, Delvina

Date

2013

Description

This research explores the gap between Black and White and Hispanic and White student degree attainment in predominately white institutions (PWI). The cost associated with each individual who fails to matriculate and attain their degree is significant for the individual, the institution and for society as a whole. The purpose of this study was to explore the risk and protective factors associated with the Black and Hispanic undergraduate experience, as well as the multiple ways in which students’ perceptions of their sense of racial/ethnic identity contribute to the specific protective mechanisms that buffer the effects of exposure to risk and foster students’ academic resiliency.
For this study, phenomenology research methodology allowed Black and Hispanic students to describe their perceptions of the undergraduate college experience at a PWI. Data collection methods included in-depth, one-on-one, semi-structured, interviews with eleven undergraduate college students.
Findings indicate that Black and Latina students experience a variety of risk and protective factors that can positively or negatively impact their identity, academic resilience and success as a student. Data results highlight the importance of a po sitive Racial/Ethnic Identity as an important protective factor for academic success. Analysis revealed that Isolation and a Lack of Sense of Belonging and Isolation, Racism and Microaggressions, and Financial Difficulties were among the most significant challenges faced by the students. The protective mechanisms of family, group and peer support, internal purpose and goals, and identity duality proved to be the most salient protective factors that contribute to student perseverance. This research revealed important insights associated with increasing positive college experiences for Black and Hispanic undergraduate students. Implications and recommendations for improving institutional commitments to these student populations will be highlighted and discussed.

Publisher

Simmons College (Boston, Mass.)

Format

1 PDF (170 Pages)

Language

English

Type

Doctoral Dissertations