Effects of the High-Probability Request Sequence on the Latencies to Compliance and Break Requests in Children with Autism during Discrete Trial Instruction

Files

laprime_dissertation_final.pdf

Citation

Laprime, Amanda, “Effects of the High-Probability Request Sequence on the Latencies to Compliance and Break Requests in Children with Autism during Discrete Trial Instruction,” Scholar@Simmons, accessed April 4, 2020, https://beatleyweb.simmons.edu/scholar/items/show/284.

Title

Effects of the High-Probability Request Sequence on the Latencies to Compliance and Break Requests in Children with Autism during Discrete Trial Instruction

Creator

Laprime, Amanda

Date

2013

Description

Researchers recommend children with autism spectrum disorders receive up to 40 hours per week of discrete trial instruction. Yet students with autism tend to have problem behavior maintained by escape from the demands inherent in discrete trials. The effects of the high-probability request sequence on the latency to problem behavior, communication responses, and academic responding to low-p requests were evaluated during discrete trials instruction using a reversal design. Four participants, ages 4 through 9, who engaged in severe problem behavior during discrete trial instruction were included in the study. The results of a functional analysis, which included a latency measurement, demonstrated that for all participants, problem behavior was sensitive to negative reinforcement in the form of escape from demands. All participants were taught a functional communication response to replace problem behavior prior to the implementation of the experimental conditions. Compared to an all-low-p request condition, the implementation of the high-p request sequence produced decreases in the latencies to compliance to low-p requests and increases in the number of trials with compliance. In addition, latency to problem behavior and communication responses increased and the number of trials with problem behavior and communication responses decreased. The results extend the literature on antecedent manipulations for reducing escape-maintained problem behavior. The results are discussed in terms of the reflexive conditioned motivating operation (CMO-R) and the discriminated avoidance paradigm, as well as the possible mechanisms responsible for the behavior changes. The study also further establishes the use of latency measures to evaluate demand aversiveness.
DESCRIPTORS: high-p request sequence, behavioral momentum, rate of reinforcement, reflexive conditioned motivating operation (CMO-R), avoidance behavior, severe problem behavior, latency

Publisher

Simmons College (Boston, Mass.)

Format

1 PDF (206 Pages)

Language

English

Type

Masters Theses