Effects of Algorithmic Curricula Upon Implementation of Trained and Novel Discrete Trial Teaching Programs

Files

effects_of_algorithmic_curriculum_upon_implementation_of_trained_and_novel_discrete_trial_teaching_programs__9182011.pdf

Citation

Herscovitch, Brandon, “Effects of Algorithmic Curricula Upon Implementation of Trained and Novel Discrete Trial Teaching Programs,” Scholar@Simmons, accessed April 4, 2020, https://beatleyweb.simmons.edu/scholar/items/show/301.

Title

Effects of Algorithmic Curricula Upon Implementation of Trained and Novel Discrete Trial Teaching Programs

Creator

Herscovitch, Brandon

Date

2011

Description

Discrete trial teaching (DTT) has been empirically validated as an effective teaching strategy for individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). These methods of instruction are intricate and require complex decision making skills on the part of the educator. Current staff training technology has proven effective for training educators to accurately implement DTT. However, these strategies on their own may not yield high levels of response generalization to untrained programs and instructional strategies requiring very different instructional response classes. The use of curricula is an alternate mode of communicating instructional procedures with direct service providers. Algorithmic curricula outline specific rules for the instructor to follow under different stimulus conditions, and may occasion textually controlled response generalization. A comprehensive algorithmic curriculum was evaluated as a decision making tool, along with the associated training, upon the procedural repertoire of behavior technicians implementing trained and novel discrete trial teaching (DTT) programs. Response accuracy was evaluated with a multiple probe design across participants. The data demonstrate that the combined effects of (1) algorithmic curricula, (2) the associated computer-based training, (3) preview of steps, as well as (4) review of errors, operated effectively upon the teaching behavior of all three participants for the program targeted during training. Additionally, participants accurately implemented novel programs presented in algorithmic format with some preview and review of material. Limitations and future considerations are discussed.

Publisher

Simmons College (Boston, Mass.)

Format

1 PDF (95 Pages)

Language

English

Type

Doctoral Dissertations