Urinary Incontinence (UI) in the Nursing Home Resident: Qualitative Study Utilizing Focus Groups & CNA Caregivers to Explore Attitudes & Beliefs of UI

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Citation

Auletto, Roxellen, “Urinary Incontinence (UI) in the Nursing Home Resident: Qualitative Study Utilizing Focus Groups & CNA Caregivers to Explore Attitudes & Beliefs of UI,” Scholar@Simmons, accessed November 14, 2019, https://beatleyweb.simmons.edu/scholar/items/show/345.

Title

Urinary Incontinence (UI) in the Nursing Home Resident: Qualitative Study Utilizing Focus Groups & CNA Caregivers to Explore Attitudes & Beliefs of UI

Creator

Auletto, Roxellen

Date

2014

Description

Urinary incontinence is recognized as a major health problem with potentially dangerous and life-threatening physical, psychological, and social concerns. Viewing urinary incontinence (UI) as part of the aging process may lead to the lack of urinary incontinence management care planning and treatment. Decreasing the incidence of UI has the potential to improve nursing home resident’s quality of life, positively impact resident and family satisfaction, and enhance nursing home staff commitment to improving patient outcomes (Miu, Lau, & Szeto, 2010). CNAs are primarily responsible for managing day-to-day toileting programs for residents and have been described as the first-line managers of incontinence (Bowers, Esmond, & Jacobson, 2000; Lawhorne, Ouslander, Parmelee, Resnick, & Calabrese, 2008). Focus group methodology was utilized to answer the research questions, “what are the attitudes and beliefs about urinary incontinence among a sample of CNA’s working in a long-term care facility” and “what are the current toileting practices implemented by a sample of CNA’s working in a long-term care facility?” Focus groups were comprised of seven to eight participants. The transcribed recordings from the three focus groups revealed five themes, lending insight into CNAs attitudes and beliefs of urinary incontinence (UI) among the residents they care for. The five themes which emerged from the data were: 1) "We're stretched too thin"; 2) "No one asks our opinions"; 3) "It's just what happens when you get old"; 4) "Some of them do this out of spite,” and 5) "It's everyone's job.” While findings from qualitative studies are not generalizable, the data from this study can inform nursing practice regarding the reality that CNAs are in need of additional, specific education about urinary incontinence, that CNA’s desire mentorship from nursing staff about better care for incontinent residents, and that a more active role in residents’ assessments and care planning is desired.

Keywords: certified nursing assistant, focus groups, nursing home resident, urinary incontinence

Publisher

Simmons College (Boston, Mass.)

Format

1 PDF (82 Pages)

Language

English

Type

Doctoral Dissertations