For God, Glory, & Government: Depictions of Violence in Visual Propaganda During the Glorious and American Revolutions

Files

Updated Final Thesis.pdf

Citation

frenchse1893, “For God, Glory, & Government: Depictions of Violence in Visual Propaganda During the Glorious and American Revolutions ,” Scholar@Simmons, accessed November 14, 2019, https://beatleyweb.simmons.edu/scholar/items/show/353.

Title

For God, Glory, & Government: Depictions of Violence in Visual Propaganda During the Glorious and American Revolutions

Creator

French, Sarah

Date

2019

Description

Revolutionaries during the Glorious Revolution (1688-89) in England and the American Revolution (1770-1783) in the American Colonies ran rigorous campaigns relying on visual propaganda to sway the opinion of the masses. Many of the primary sources utilized in this paper are visual broadsides containing propaganda imagery. These sources can be divided into two different categories, the visual propaganda of the Glorious Revolution and that of the American Revolution. Unlike other scholarly works on the Glorious Revolution and the American Revolution, this paper compares the images from each category to each other. Secondary sources include academic works on propaganda, persuasion, and the theories surrounding both. In this paper I apply these theories to my primary source base in order to trace the common theme of violence (both collective religious and collective political violence) utilized during both revolutions and identify the elements that made visual propaganda such a successful persuasion strategy. In this thesis I will argue that depictions of collective religious violence propagandists of the Glorious Revolution emphasized right, specifically the right to rule England. Eighty years later propagandists of the American Revolution emphasized innocence through the visualization of collective political violence. Their propaganda accomplished this by depicting the enemy as foolish and cowardly, which worked as a means of evoking the propagandist’s intended emotional response from their audiences during the Glorious Revolution and the American Revolution. Determining the central theme of violence and the elements that commonly speak to this theme help to evaluate the impact of public opinion in the Glorious Revolution and the American Revolution, as well as later revolutions and wars. These campaigns set a precedent that has been utilized throughout each war and revolution that followed. Through these campaigns the masses broke through class barriers, including literacy and wealth, and accomplished unreversed change. The significance of visual propaganda during the Glorious Revolution and the American Revolution can best be captured by the lasting institutions of a constitutional monarchy and a presidency determined by the people and for the people.

Subject

Early Modern; Revolutions; Glorious Revolution; American Revolution; Propaganda; Visual Propaganda; 1688; 1770s

Publisher

Simmons University (Boston, Mass.)

Format

1 PDF (116 Pages)

Language

English

Type

Masters Theses

Potential Collection

Dual History and Archives Management