Effects of Varying Three Procedural Variables Using Response Cards During Instruction

Files

dissertation_final.pdf

Citation

Santosuosso, Lyndsay, “Effects of Varying Three Procedural Variables Using Response Cards During Instruction,” Scholar@Simmons, accessed November 14, 2019, https://beatleyweb.simmons.edu/scholar/items/show/357.

Title

Effects of Varying Three Procedural Variables Using Response Cards During Instruction

Creator

Santosuosso, Lyndsay

Date

2019

Description

In classrooms, lessons utilizing response cards have been shown to be of greater benefit to learning when compared to lessons that use other forms of active student responding. The current study conducted three experiments to extend this research on response cards to determine the most effective procedural variables of the method on student learning and on-task behavior. Three experiments were conducted in a fourth grade general education classroom during social studies lessons. Although there were no statistically significant results, there were notable differences among conditions in each experiment. Experiment one found that a 10-second wait time (the amount of time between when the students were shown the answer choices and when they were permitted to respond) produced greater pre-posttest differences, greater response accuracy, and the least off-task behavior compared to a 3 or 5-second wait time. Experiment two found that a 3-second think time (defined as the amount of time between when the question was shown and when the answer choices were displayed to the students) produced a greater pre-posttest difference and greater response accuracy than a 0 or 5-second think time, while a 0-second think time had the least off-task behavior. Experiment three found that when response cards were made private or hidden to other students there was a greater pre-posttest difference, greater response accuracy, and the least off-task behavior than when response card selections were made public to other students.

Publisher

Simmons University (Boston, Mass.)

Format

1 PDF (92 Pages)

Language

English

Type

Doctoral Dissertations