REFLECTION BEFORE ACTION: EXPLORING CULTURALLY CONGRUENT SIMULATED HEALTHCARE PRACTICE

Files

Cali-Ryan Collin Dissertation.pdf

Citation

[Unknown User], “REFLECTION BEFORE ACTION: EXPLORING CULTURALLY CONGRUENT SIMULATED HEALTHCARE PRACTICE ,” Scholar@Simmons, accessed September 25, 2020, https://beatleyweb.simmons.edu/scholar/items/show/401.

Title

REFLECTION BEFORE ACTION: EXPLORING CULTURALLY CONGRUENT SIMULATED HEALTHCARE PRACTICE

Creator

Collin, Cali-Ryan R

Date

2020

Description

Disparities in health and healthcare outcomes among underrepresented minority groups are a persistent problem in the United States. Both provider and structural discrimination and bias contribute to the discrepancies in access and quality of care which impact the health and well-being of such groups. Culturally congruent care is one approach to practice purported to address disparities in health and health care. Incorporating culturally congruent care into practice can begin with educational interventions. Guided by an integrated framework of Jeffreys’ Cultural Competence and Confidence model, Kolb’s Theory of Experiential Learning, and the Conceptual Model of Reflection proposed by Nguyen, Fernandez, Karsenti, and Charlin, this study examines and compares the effect of the addition of a written reflection prior to a simulation exercise on culturally congruent practice behaviors in social work and nursing students.

Social work and nursing students (N = 81) were recruited and randomly assigned to either the control group, which was the standard simulation experience, or the intervention group, which was the standard simulation experience plus written pre-reflection. Independent samples t tests and the Mann-Whitney U test were used to assess for differences between groups in total score and three subscales of the Cultural Competence Clinical Evaluation Tool - Student Version (CCCET-SV), culturally specific care; cultural assessment; and culturally sensitive and professionally appropriate attitudes, values, and beliefs.

Results indicated no significant differences between the experimental and control group in total scores or subscale scores. Students’ CCCET-SV scores in the experimental group were not significantly different than those in the control group, demonstrating that written reflection prior to participation in a simulation experience did not significantly impact culturally congruent practice behaviors when compared to those participating in the simulation alone. There may be several factors that impacted study findings including the possibility that simulation is considered a high impact learning experience as well as differences in students’ foundational understanding of culture. Despite the non-significant findings, this study provides insight into the design and implementation of experiential learning activities that might enhance culturally congruent practice in nursing and social work education.

Subject

Culturally congruent care; reflection; social work; nursing; simulation; interprofessional

Publisher

Simmons University (Boston, Mass.)

Rights

Material from the Simmons University Archives collections are made available for study purposes only. For more information, or to request rights to reproduce or reuse any material, contact the the Simmons University Archives at archives@simmons.edu.

Format

1 PDF (124 Pages)

Language

English

Type

Doctoral Dissertations

PhD Collections

Health Professionals Education, PhD