The Effect of an Educational Video Intervention on Knowledge of Obesity and Weight Bias in Dietetic Interns: A Mixed Methods Analysis

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Citation

[Unknown User], “The Effect of an Educational Video Intervention on Knowledge of Obesity and Weight Bias in Dietetic Interns: A Mixed Methods Analysis,” Scholar@Simmons, accessed September 25, 2020, https://beatleyweb.simmons.edu/scholar/items/show/427.

Title

The Effect of an Educational Video Intervention on Knowledge of Obesity and Weight Bias in Dietetic Interns: A Mixed Methods Analysis

Creator

Isom, Kellene

Date

2020

Description

The U.S. obesity rate is projected to reach 50% in all states by 2030 (Ward, Bleich, & Cradock et al., 2019). People with obesity are at increased risk for many health issues (CDC, 2020). Another issue people with obesity face is obesity bias (Puhl & Brownell, 2001). Obesity bias can counteract the care dietitians and other healthcare professionals provide their patients (Friedman & Puhl, 2012). Unfortunately, nutrition professionals are not immune to obesity bias (Jung et al., 2015), as they are prone to believe the causes of obesity are solely due to internal factors people can control, such as behavior and lifestyle, rather than internal and external factors they cannot control, such as their genetics/biology or environment. This study utilized a randomized controlled design during a dietetic internship Obesity Class Day to examine the effect of a brief educational video intervention about weight bias in healthcare on explicit and implicit obesity bias and obesity knowledge among dietetic interns. The validated Obesity Related Knowledge-10 (ORK-10) and Beliefs About Obese Persons (BAOP) questionnaires were used to measure obesity knowledge at baseline among dietetic interns, while the validated Anti-Fat Attitudes (AFA) questionnaire and Implicit Association Test (IAT) were used to measure explicit and implicit bias, respectively. Changes in obesity knowledge and bias were measured after the implementation of the educational video intervention. Means and standard deviations were calculated for parametric variables and medians and percentiles were calculated for nonparametric variables at baseline. Spearman correlations were calculated to determine the association between obesity knowledge and bias. Differences between baseline and post-education changes and post-education and one-month changes in bias and knowledge were calculated. Dietetic interns had moderate obesity knowledge, low to moderate explicit bias, and high implicit bias. The educational intervention led to significant decreases in explicit and implicit bias from baseline to post-education; however, there were no changes in obesity knowledge. The decrease in implicit bias was maintained one-month after the intervention. A brief educational video intervention caused a significant decrease in weight bias among dietetic interns. Therefore, further research interventions are needed to sustain a decreased level of bias.

Subject

obesity, weight, bias, stigma, nutrition, dietetics, intern

Publisher

Simmons University (Boston, Mass.)

Format

1 PDF

Language

English

Type

Doctoral Dissertations

PhD Collections

Health Professionals Education, PhD