In Vitro Effects of Perfluorooctanoic Acid on Mammalian Cell Migration and Invasion

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Citation

Pantazopoulos, Joanna, “In Vitro Effects of Perfluorooctanoic Acid on Mammalian Cell Migration and Invasion,” Scholar@Simmons, accessed August 12, 2020, https://beatleyweb.simmons.edu/scholar/items/show/474.

Title

In Vitro Effects of Perfluorooctanoic Acid on Mammalian Cell Migration and Invasion

Creator

Pantazopoulos, Joanna

Date

2020

Description

"Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA), is a manmade surfactant used in manufacturing industrial products including Teflon products, waterproof fabrics, and firefighting foams. PFOA is a non-biodegradable, organic pollutant that accumulates in the human body and environment. Most common sources of exposure to PFOA are contaminated food and drinking water. Environmental contamination of this pollutant has shown links to certain cancers, infertility, bodyweight reduction, hormone disruption, endometriosis, and cancers including hepatic and testicular cancers (U.S. EPA, 2005). Both cancer and endometriosis are characterized by over proliferative, highly migratory cells. The effects of PFOA on these cellular mechanisms are not fully understood. This research aims to determine the effects of PFOA on mammalian fibroblast migration, proliferation, and invasion. Proliferation assays will be used to determine sublethal doses of PFOA for use in subsequent experiments. Scratch wound data will quantify any effects of PFOA on migration. Invasion assays will also quantify and visualize the effects of PFOA exposure on cellular invasion, migration, and actin formation. Immunofluorescence will be used to visualize cellular morphology and actin organization after exposure to PFOA compared to controls of octanoic acid and DMSO. Preliminary data indicates possible morphological changes resulting from PFOA exposure with concomitant effects on cell migration.

Video available upon request.

Subject

In-vitro; Environmental toxins; Environmental contamination; Cellular migration; Cellular invasion

Publisher

Simmons University (Boston, Mass.)

Rights

Material from the Simmons University Archives collections are made available for study purposes only. For more information, or to request rights to reproduce or reuse any material, contact the the Simmons University Archives at archives@simmons.edu.

Format

mp4 video

Language

English

Type

Undergraduate Symposium
Project Discipline: Biology