Authority, structure and policy: the roots of U.S. occupation in postwar Germany and Japan.

Files

Shotkoski_thesis_2016.pdf

Citation

Shotkoski, Marya R., author., “Authority, structure and policy: the roots of U.S. occupation in postwar Germany and Japan.,” Scholar@Simmons, accessed December 4, 2020, https://beatleyweb.simmons.edu/scholar/items/show/48.

Title

Authority, structure and policy: the roots of U.S. occupation in postwar Germany and Japan.

Creator

Shotkoski, Marya R., author.

Date

2016

Description

This thesis examines U.S. occupations and is a careful comparison of Germany and Japan, in contrast and comparison to Cuba, the Philippines, and Haiti. This thesis draws upon government records to analyze the similarities and differences that exist between U.S. occupations. The two main chapters of the thesis focus on Japan and Germany, respectively. Each chapter is divided into three main topics: authority for the occupation, the organization or structure that was planned and the policies and directives. The final part of the thesis analyzes the occupations of Germany and Japan for resemblances and variations.
The occupations of Germany and Japan were the product of years of culminated experience in occupying countries. Both Germany and Japan are a part of a larger history of United States occupations. U.S. occupations were not events that existed solely by themselves rather they were dynamic events that built upon previous knowledge and situations. My research contributes to the scholarship though the comparison of United States occupations as a whole, which has not been done by other historians. This comparison will produce a richer understanding of the influences and contexts that helped shape U.S. occupations during the twentieth century.
Thesis (Masters) -- Simmons College, 2016.
Bibliography: pages 62-65.

Subject

World politics -- 1945-1955.
Japan -- History -- Allied occupation, 1945-1952.
Germany -- History -- 1945-1955.
Political culture -- United States.

Publisher

Simmons College (Boston, Mass.)

Format

1 PDF (65 pages)

Language

English

Type

Masters Theses

Identifier

D843.S56 2016