The Effects of Vibrotactile Feedback Schedules on the Acquisition and Maintenance of Proper Sitting Posture

Files

Jadro Dissertation Library Submission 12.18.20.pdf

Citation

Brian.jadro, “The Effects of Vibrotactile Feedback Schedules on the Acquisition and Maintenance of Proper Sitting Posture,” [email protected], accessed March 5, 2021, https://beatleyweb.simmons.edu/scholar/items/show/522.

Title

The Effects of Vibrotactile Feedback Schedules on the Acquisition and Maintenance of Proper Sitting Posture

Creator

Jadro, Brian V.

Date

2020

Description

Despite the link between long periods of sitting and low back pain, most home and office seating options are not ergonomic and do not support correct posture. As the workforce becomes increasingly sedentary and more tasks become computer-based, employees are likely to spend extended periods of time sitting with poor posture. This study examined the effects of vibrotactile feedback on acquiring and maintaining proper sitting posture in six participants between the ages of 28 and 39. Following baseline data collection, participants were provided with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration standards for setting up proper workplace sitting positions. Upon independent review of this information, participants were again subjected to a no feedback condition to evaluate the effects of an information-only intervention, before being subjected to a feedback with schedule fading procedure. Posture data were recorded using the UPRIGHT GO2 device and software. Mobility and pain ratings were collected at baseline and following the feedback schedule fading procedure using the Oswestry Disability Index. Results indicated that feedback was effective in increasing proper sitting posture, increasing functional mobility, and decreasing self-reports of pain. A substantial improvement in posture was observed for all participants during the immediate feedback condition, and posture remained improved over baseline measures for all participants when feedback was faded to a 30s interval. Posture also remained improved over baseline measures for all participants who participated in a follow-up, no feedback maintenance condition.

Subject

Applied Behavior Analysis, Behavioral Medicine

Publisher

Simmons University (Boston, Mass.)

Format

1 PDF (75 Pages)

Language

English

Type

Doctoral Dissertations

PhD Collections

Behavioral Analysis, PhD