Harriet P. Dame: The Fight for Control Over Civil War Memory In New Hampshire

Files

Horrocks_Masters Thesis_Simmons University_History Dept.pdf

Citation

[Unknown User], “Harriet P. Dame: The Fight for Control Over Civil War Memory In New Hampshire,” [email protected], accessed March 5, 2021, https://beatleyweb.simmons.edu/scholar/items/show/534.

Title

Harriet P. Dame: The Fight for Control Over Civil War Memory In New Hampshire

Creator

Horrocks, Amanda

Date

2021

Description

Harriet Patience Dame of Concord, New Hampshire, volunteered as a regimental nurse with the Second Regiment of the New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry during the American Civil War (1861-1865). She served with the Second throughout the entirety of the war, leaving the regiment for only a few months to complete some research requests at Army hospitals. As the war waged on, Dame appeared to always be in the right place at the right time. She remained alongside the soldiers during major battles like Gettysburg, captured twice by Confederate troops, and saved numerous soldiers left for dead. In the decades to follow, Dame’s courageous efforts made newspaper headlines across the nation. Her fame started among veterans and their families, but media coverage of her experiences elevated her to the status of a wartime celebrity among the general public. The status of a wartime hero was a privilege often reserved for men but Dame’s actions proved to be deserving of the same level of recognition. Dame received numerous accolades that commemorated her involvement in the war, ranging from special speeches and celebrations, to physical medals and monuments. In this thesis I argue, that Harriet Dame’s celebrity status in a wartime context resulted in her becoming a symbolic icon of domesticity and this representation was used as a tool in shaping the national and New Hampshire state memory of the medical field during the Civil War. No current research scholarship that analyzes the development of Civil War memory in New Hampshire exists. This thesis provides insight into the development of Civil War memory in New Hampshire that is centrally focused on Harriet Dame. Her dedication to the state was celebrated with the creation of physical memorials that are located throughout the capitol. The decision to commemorate Dame with memorials that are accessible to the general public, indicates how the state wanted the Civil War to be remembered.

Subject

Civil War/Collective Memory/Nurses

Publisher

Simmons University (Boston, Mass.)

Format

1 PDF (61 Pages)

Language

English

Type

Masters Theses

Potential Collection

History

Collection