Nurse Faculty Experience and Meaning: What is the Lived Experience of Nurse Faculty with the Teaching of Caring in Master's Level Nursing Education

Files

nfem19.1b2a.pdf

Citation

Pineau, Donna, “ Nurse Faculty Experience and Meaning: What is the Lived Experience of Nurse Faculty with the Teaching of Caring in Master's Level Nursing Education,” Scholar@Simmons, accessed April 4, 2020, https://beatleyweb.simmons.edu/scholar/items/show/69.

Title


Nurse Faculty Experience and Meaning: What is the Lived Experience of Nurse Faculty with the Teaching of Caring in Master's Level Nursing Education

Creator

Pineau, Donna

Date

2018

Description

Caring is a foundational value in nursing. Offering caring is an important challenge in the current healthcare system which is highly focused on cost and technological advancement. In order to preserve caring in nursing, faculty must remain vigilant with the teaching of caring in all levels of nursing education. Students at the master’s level will be the profession’s future leaders. Graduate nursing faculty are in a powerful position to teach rich understanding of caring with their master’s level students, yet there is very limited research on the teaching of caring at the graduate level. The research question for this study was: What is the lived experience of nurse faculty with the teaching of caring in master’s level nursing education? The conceptual framework for the study was Jean Watson’s Theory of Human Caring. A hermeneutic phenomenological interpretive design and Van Manen’s line-by-line methodological approach guided the analysis of interviews with fifteen nurse educators teaching at the master’s level. After final reflection on each interview, data were analyzed across all interviews for identification of themes and the presence of key concepts in Watson’s theoretical propositions. Findings revealed three themes. Connectedness: a relationship of reverence; occurs when the respect for the wholeness of the student is central to the teacher. Exemplifying caring: a way of being; represents embodiment of the attributes of caring that becomes the way the teacher expresses and models caring. Upholding the high standards of the caring discipline of nursing; represents faculty’s commitment to developing professionalism. Many of the concepts in Watson’s theoretical propositions were identified by the participants as they described their experiences of teaching caring. This research has implications for education, practice, policy, and future research. If nursing is to continue as a caring discipline, then caring must be central to the education of students at all levels of nursing education, and must be fully integrated into curricula design, and professional development of faculty. Nurses must advocate for policies and further research related to caring so that health, healing, and humanizing care remains central to the profession.

Publisher

Simmons College (Boston, Mass.)

Format

1 PDF (121 Pages)

Language

English

Type

Doctoral Dissertation