The Examination of Stereotypic Behavior as Adjunctive Behavior in Children with Autism During Progressive and Regressive Schedules of Reinforcement

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Citation

Piskura, Timothy, “The Examination of Stereotypic Behavior as Adjunctive Behavior in Children with Autism During Progressive and Regressive Schedules of Reinforcement,” Scholar@Simmons, accessed April 4, 2020, https://beatleyweb.simmons.edu/scholar/items/show/73.

Title

The Examination of Stereotypic Behavior as Adjunctive Behavior in Children with Autism During Progressive and Regressive Schedules of Reinforcement

Creator

Piskura, Timothy

Date

2018

Description

Both basic and applied research has documented the occurrence of adjunctive behavior. Adjunctive behavior has been defined as behavior that occurs and is maintained indirectly by on-going reinforcement of an unrelated response (Foster, 1978; Mace & Wacker, 1994). Adjunctive behaviors are those that are not under the direct control of a specific reinforcing stimuli, but instead, are evoked by the schedule that the reinforcing stimuli are delivered on. Previous research has provided limited criteria for how to identify the presence and/or occurrence of what would be considered an adjunctive behavior for humans in treatment and education settings. During experimental conditions, a progressive ratio schedule of reinforcement followed by a regressive ratio schedule of reinforcement was in place to control targeted operant responding. For responding to have been considered to be adjunctive the response would have had to occur early within the inter-reinforcement interval, typically immediately after receipt of the scheduled reinforcing stimulus and occur at a much greater magnitude then observed at other times. Results indicate that stereotypy fit the definitional characteristics of adjunctive behavior. Different measurement considerations of adjunctive behavior suggest a monotonic or a bitonic function.

Publisher

Simmons College (Boston, Mass.)

Format

1 PDF (49 pages)

Language

English

Type

Doctoral Dissertation

Collection